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The new logic… technologic

It's not surprising to me that the first shape my eldest daughter learned was a triangle – her point of reference was the Play button on the DVD player

"Charge it, point it, zoom it, press it,

Snap it, work it, quick - erase it,

Write it, cut it, paste it, save it,

Load it, check it, quick - rewrite it,

These are lyrics from "Technologic" - Daft Punk's 2005 ode to the new skill set of the next generation. Where once upon a time cutting and pasting actually involved a pair of scissors and glue, our evolution into an age of digital skills, the so called "digital native" is moving ahead in leaps and bounds.

This creates a quandary. Technology is moving so rapidly, are we expected keep up? I hear grandparents and parents lament that "it's second nature to them" when a two-year-old knows how to change the ringtone on their smartphone.

Not too long ago computers required a fair degree of hand-eye co-ordination. But this is no longer the case since the advent of gesture-based computing, which even in its infancy is proving to be remarkably effective. Where once the manipulation of a mouse restricted access for young users, now we swipe, touch, shake and trace, opening up a new world of opportunities. For the companies behind the tech boom, this also means access to a new world of very powerful consumers…. children.

It's not surprising to me that the first shape my eldest daughter learned was a triangle – her point of reference was the Play button on the DVD player. In hindsight, not one of my proudest parenting moments, but again, indicative of the landscape we find ourselves rearing children in today. I'm raising my children to be techno-savvy and the day will come when I too can't keep up. I am slightly scared and equally excited by the future – a world of unknown technological change is awaiting us and our future generations.

I think I'm lucky that change generally doesn't terrify me – perhaps my genes include the ‘cup half full' chromosome. But I'm also mindful that not everyone embraces change nor sees each one as an opportunity, particularly around technology. When I wear my early childhood hat, I'm also acutely aware that my comfort zone should not be imposed on children (mine or others in my line of influence). It reminds me of an old Chinese proverb:

[quote]Do not confine your children to your own learning, for they were born in another time.[/quote]

That's why I believe we owe it to the future generations to encourage a world of looking at things through a new lens. Times are changing, skills are changing and like it or not, the future starts here: Technologic is the new logic.