Study - Ways to Study - Connected Learning

Connected Learning

Connected learning is when students learn with a teacher and other students via web conferencing technology as part of a virtual classroom. 

Teachers lead a virtual classroom where students from different locations access at the same time.

They typically include interactive exercises, which are an effective way of transferring knowledge and embedding skills.

It is different from online delivery because students and teachers are connected in real-time via web-conferencing.

Connected learning during COVID-19

Connected learning is now more widely available to support the current need for social distancing.

Practical and interactive activities are a part of connected learning. However, modified face-to-face delivery will continue when it is needed, with practical exercises adjusted for social distancing and hygiene practices.

Teachers will provide students with the specific details of how their classes in Term 2 will run, incorporating connected learning, modified face-to-face training and other methods.

Benefits for students

Connected learning enables students and teachers to connect and continue their learning program while practising social distancing. Students benefit from:

  • A teacher guiding their class through all of their learning activities

  • Individual support from their teacher to help them stay on track

  • Access to classmates and social interaction with peers within a virtual classroom

  • Learning valuable remote working skills, which are increasingly important in modern workplaces.

By engaging in connected learning, students and teachers are able to build skills highly valued by employers such as digital literacy, remote working, problem solving and resilience.

Getting ready for connected learning

TAFE NSW uses several web conferencing technology platforms to connect students and teachers. Examples include Microsoft Teams and Adobe Connect

While teachers will provide students with personalised updates on class times and platforms, the Getting Ready for Connected Learning Guide provides a general summary of:

  • what to expect, 

  • what students will typically need to get ready, and

  • tips for troubleshooting. 

Participating in connected learning

The same rules of apply within virtual classrooms as in other TAFE NSW learning spaces. This Connected Learning Expectation Guide helps you understand how you can successfully participate, respect others and stay safe.

If you are experiencing difficulties with access to Connected Learning, please call the TAFE NSW ICT Student Support Service Desk on 131601.

Select option 4 for Technology Support, then option 2.

Study - Ways to Study - Connected Learning - FAQs

Connected learning is when students learn with a teacher and other students via web conferencing technology as part of a virtual classroom.

Teachers lead a virtual classroom that is accessed by students in different locations at the same time. They typically include interactive exercises, which are an effective way of building knowledge and embedding skills.

Connected Learning is different from online delivery in that student and teachers connect in real-time via web-conferencing. Online learning is more self-paced and self-directed.

Connected learning has grown in popularity in recent years, mostly due to ongoing benefits and the positive and engaging experiences that students have.

While getting started may be a little challenging if you aren’t used to it, students will benefits from:

  • A teacher guiding them their class through all of their learning activities

  • Individual support from their teacher to help them stay on track

  • Access to classmates and social interaction with peers within a virtual classroom

  • Learning valuable remote working skills, which are increasingly important in modern workplaces.

To make the transition as easy as possible, start with Getting Ready for Connected Learning. This useful guide provides a general summary of what to expect, what students will typically need to get ready, and some tips for troubleshooting.

Practical and interactive activities are a component of connected learning. However, modified face-to-face delivery will continue where needed for critical skills areas, with practical activities adjusted for social distancing and hygiene practices.

You will need a device to connect to the class from home – preferably a laptop or computer. You can use a mobile phone but it isn’t ideal for long periods of time.

There are more details in the Getting Ready for Connected Learning Guide. It provides a general summary of what to expect, what students will typically need to get ready, and some tips for troubleshooting.

Ideally, you will have a private, distraction free environment. Make sure people around you know you are at class. It is a good idea to turn on your camera before class to check the background is appropriate.